open your mind

scarletxleigh:

Cuffs from my shop Bird In A Ribcage

P.S. There’s a 20% sale on everything in the shop.

tamorapierce:

theartofanimation:

Chiara Bautista

I would love to have a couple of panels of this as art!  This is beautiful!

hammpix:

When drawing feet, it helps to draw a line (here shown in orange) leading along the crest of the foot to the big toe. This defines the shape of the foot in 3-D, helping you shape the rest of the foot properly. You can erase the line afterward. (I’ve also posted useful photo reference of feet here in an earlier post.)

hammpix:

When drawing feet, it helps to draw a line (here shown in orange) leading along the crest of the foot to the big toe. This defines the shape of the foot in 3-D, helping you shape the rest of the foot properly. You can erase the line afterward. (I’ve also posted useful photo reference of feet here in an earlier post.)

hammpix:

As an artist, you’ll have to draw turned heads countless times. But when the head is turned, drawing the far eye poses a special challenge. This is because we must foreshorten that eye more than we’re used to, and because we’re tempted to shape it like the near eye, which is less foreshortened. Therefore, it’s useful to practice drawing the far eye by itself, without the near eye to throw you off. Print these sheets, draw the eyes, and you’ll save yourself great difficulty later.

Note that all of these eyes are facing our left. You’ll need to practice right-facing eyes as well, so flop the sheets in Photoshop, print them again, and draw those also.

hammpix:

The relaxed, semi-cupped hand: as an artist, you will draw this a billion, zillion times. Print these out for practice and reference.

Plus, here’s some foot reference.

(EDIT: No, this is not a post about crotches & butts, but you’ll need to know how to draw those, too, if you’re drawing hands relaxed at one’s sides. Note that the big thumb knuckle generally falls at crotch-height. Note also that the palm rarely faces the thigh directly: the palm-side of a relaxed hand tends to angle *slightly* toward the back; the knuckle-side angles slightly forward. This reverses as the hands swing behind the walking figure. For more tips, visit me on Twitter: @Hamm_Tips)

yeahwriters:

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

This is like the Story Beginnings Bible.

sixpenceee:

If you are looking for a good book to read. I recommend this one. 
This entire book was written by a man whose stroke plunged him into a 21 day coma. He awakened to find himself fully paralyzed except for one eye and a part of his head. He survived an entire month, enough to publish an entire book. 
How did he do this?
He dictated his book one character at a time by blinking his left eyelid while an assistant recited letters. 
200,000 blinks tells his entire story. He died 3 days after the book was published due to pneumonia. 

sixpenceee:

If you are looking for a good book to read. I recommend this one. 

This entire book was written by a man whose stroke plunged him into a 21 day coma. He awakened to find himself fully paralyzed except for one eye and a part of his head. He survived an entire month, enough to publish an entire book. 

How did he do this?

He dictated his book one character at a time by blinking his left eyelid while an assistant recited letters. 

200,000 blinks tells his entire story. He died 3 days after the book was published due to pneumonia. 

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.
Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.
What you’ll need:
circular knitting needles
yarn
small scales
You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.
Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!
(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)
Read More

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.

Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.

What you’ll need:

  • circular knitting needles
  • yarn
  • small scales

You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.

Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!

(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)

Read More

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDSMore on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDS

More on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.

Norm